Do you often take reckless and unnecessary risks that put you in danger?


Be brave. Take risks. Nothing can substitute experience.”

— Paulo Coelho

Coelho is not the first, nor will he be the last, to speak about why taking risks is integral to our success stories. Muhammad Ali also once said: “He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life.”

Perfect. You can’t argue with these gems of knowledge. They are true: we cannot achieve much in life without getting out of our comfort zones, unless things are served to us on a platter.

But we all know there’s a difference between taking good risks and attempting reckless ones. Here, we will talk about those people who can’t distinguish between the two. Those who take unnecessary risks, which are sometimes not only plain stupid, but also dangerous and fatal. We’re talking about risks that cause damages.

taking risks

Now that we have distinguished between good risks and bad ones, let’s now find out how by looking at handwriting we can know whether someone takes risks to get ahead in life or screw up his life.

Very few of us will disagree with the belief that life is all about limitations in right doses. Even the best of risk takers do not beyond a point and their moves are mostly calculated and thoughtful. But those who make reckless risks without an iota of planning or preparations fall on their faces and often end up with a bloody nose, if not literally in all cases.

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In graphology, or handwriting analysis, a person’s ability to understand and respect his limitations is seen in the way he uses margins on all sides of the page — top, bottom, left and right. The presence of margins, or the lack of it, in a handwriting sample points to some very crucial personality traits of the writer, and his inclination/aversion to take calculated/dangerous risks is seen in the right margin of the handwriting.

Also Read: Signature Analysis

For example, people who leave a lot of margin on the right tend to be overcautious all the time, whereas those whose pens usually crash into the right edge of the paper are the ones who do not differentiate between good and bad risks. They fail to comprehend that though it’s important to push the boundaries in pursuit of excellence and success, it is equally important to know when to stop.

To know about crushed right margin and many other types, read this wonderful article by Write Choice author Bhavana Bhat on margins in handwriting.